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It’s an amazing time at the Nature Bath

After a long of exploring, hiking and being a tourist, all I want to do is lay back, chill out and rejuvenate. In Iceland, the best thing one can do is go to one of the few lagoons or hot springs dotted around the island. The most famous one out of all of them is the Blue Lagoon. It appears in every advertisements, brochures and tour packages of Iceland. It certainly looks gorgeous but needless to say, it is very touristy. The major setbacks are that it costs 40euros for just the entry to the place and that you have to book a time to visit it, which means that there is a time limit.

In my books, that is extremely expensive for what you are getting. Other options are the Secret Lagoon and the Mytavn Nature Bath. These two options are significantly cheaper and less touristy, but also smaller. We went to the Mytavn Nature Bath after a long day of hiking and exploring the area. At 17 to 20euros, it seemed way more worth it for a bath. The place included 3 pools of different temperatures, a steam room and a “shower” spot. It looked gorgeous at first sight: the soft blue hue of the water, the steam rising up in the air, the large boulders where people sit and relax, the wooden platforms and the distant sunset painting the atmosphere with an even softer orange hue.

We take off our clothes, put on our swim wear and wade our way through the creamy water. Almost immediately, you can feel the effect of the minerals on your skin, making it feel really smooth and soft; unlike most hot tubs where the sulphuric water can give adverse side effects to your skin after long exposures. It seemed like many locals use the nature baths daily after work to take a break from life. I think if I lived here, I would do the same too. But for now, I will enjoy the tranquillity of the atmosphere and rest my feet and mind…

Where is your favourite natural lagoon to chill in?

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Glacier ice caves are one of Earth’s most impressive and mind-blowing phenomenon. After thousands of years of pressure, the massive glacier packs the snow tightly into clear blue ice formations as air bubbles are forced out. The caves/tunnels are then formed by water running underneath the huge glacier. This means that not only thousands of years of land history can be seen frozen in time in the ice but also every year the caves and tunnels look different due to the unpredictability and irregular melting of ice.

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Caves formed by Glaciers

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Iceland is a heavenly place for all photographers out there, especially the landscapers. Regardless of who you are and your level of skill, you won’t be able to resist the urge to whip out your DSLR, iPhones, Androids, Tablets, Mirrorless, etc to take a million pictures. 

I definitely do not consider myself a professional photographer, just merely an amateur enthusiast. There were many times during the trip where I wish I had a wide angle lens to capture EVERYTHING i’m looking at. Instead, i took many panorama pictures and get mesmerised by all of them. I want to dedicate a whole post to my panorama pictures because I think they are worth showing off and displaying. if you’d like a large view of the panorama, just click on them! If you like them please comment down below and tell me what you think!

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Waterfalls of Iceland

Waterfalls are everywhere in Iceland thanks to its huge mountains. There are many hidden and unadvertised waterfalls, and then there are those that are so popular that everyone visits them. Regardless of the popularity, waterfalls are still one of the nature’s best gifts to man kind.

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Aurora Borealis: Incredible Natural Phenomenon

The Northern Lights are on EVERYONE’s bucketlist. Probably the most popular phenomenon to chase, the Aurora can only be seen from the very northern parts of the world, such as Canada, Alaska, Norway, Sweden, Iceland and Russia.

Even being there on the right time of the year does not guarantee you a chance to witness this incredible sighting. I spent 2 months gallivanting around Scandinavia and was not lucky enough to see them, my last chance of seeing it in Europe was going to be Iceland and I was determined.

Here are some of the attempts I’ve done at shooting the Aurora, like I said, it’s nothing professional, but then again, the experience is Below is everything I’ve learned from my experience chasing the Aurora, take it or not I will leave that up to you.

What I’ve learned about chasing the Northern Lights

  • Increase your chances of seeing them: 1. set yourself in rural places of the country, the further you are away from cities and big towns, the less amount of light pollution that will affect your ability to see it. 2. Check out the different websites that give you an idea of what to expect for the night, but don’t take it too seriously. 3. Give yourself more time, don’t go to Iceland for a few days and expect to have a huge chance to capture it. 4. Prepare yourself for the cold, the Lights appear whenever the Sun is down and during the times of the year that is still very cold, to capture and fully appreciate the Lights, wear plenty of cold, wind proof gear, it’s all in the experience. 5. Try to chase the lights when there is no moon, this dims the lights somewhat but not completely.

  • There are plenty of reports and predictions of the conditions to see the Aurora, however, what I experience on the ground and what the report says almost never matches. The best is to look out your window: if you can see stars, it’s clear enough to see the Lights; the Lights will be there regardless of the season, it’s whether its activity is strong enough or not; the reports have given me a 3/10 activity but it was extremely strong that day compared to other 5/10 days. 

  • DO NOT BUY A NORTHERN LIGHTS TOUR, it does not guarantee you anything, not even money back if you do not see it. The money you spend are mostly for the 4WD experience out to the middle of nowhere to view the lights. 

What little I’ve learned about taking pictures of the Northern Lights

  • Get a decent tripod and hope that it’s not so windy.

  • Make sure you don’t face a big light source like a city.

  • Have good lenses, at least one with aperture of f2.8 or 2, this usually affects the quality more than the camera. At least have a mirrorless camera.

  • Be Patient, you will take a few really crappy pictures before figuring it out, mostly because you can’t preview what you are taking in the dark.

  • Have extra batteries because you will be taking ALOT OF PICTURES.

  • Learn how much shutter time is good for your camera. My sweet spot turned out to be 20 secs.

  • Helps to have remote controlled shutter, if not it’s not the end of the world.

Have you ever seen the Lights?

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