Vanua Levu

This is the main Island of Fiji. Nadi is the city that everyone lands in. It’s a really small and busy “city”. Here is where you will find most of your main transportation to the other parts of the island. The Nadi Bus Terminal takes you either up north to Lautoka, the second largest city and the sugar city of Fiji or to the south to the Sigatoka and east to Suva.

Denarau port takes you to the Mamanuca island group and the Yasawa island group. Mamanuca

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Fijian cuisine is relatively simple and kept that way for good reasons. Since it’s a largely agricultural nation, Fijians live off their land and selling whatever surplus they have. Thanks to the varying terrains, climates and fertile soil from the volcanoes, the nation grows a large variety of produce; from rice in the wetter East to kulu (breadfruit) and sugar cane in the drier West.

Their main staple is cassava, that can grow anywhere warm and fertile, which is everywhere. Almost every meal or

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Climate

Winter is dry season is from March to November. Typically the best time to go though more tourist during May to August. It’s easy to escape from the touristy parts of Fiji as long as you go away from the main island.  Summer rainy season is from December to February. Practically no tourist at this point as the risk for cyclone is rather high. There are some years that the rains are mild, ideal for water sports. 

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View from the Hospital

Of all the attractions in Taveuni, the one that had been recommended to me by the kids here was the Rock Slide. As I was living with Maori’s cousin, Benny, at that time, he was more than stoked to take me and my friends there. What was described to me were these naturally formed “slides”from big boulders carved out by the water running through it. It was a popular spot from all the kids to go during the summer when it’s sweltering hot outside. Naturally, I wanted to see it

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Before my final days in Taveuni, my good friend, Maori, decided to make a Lovo for me, proclaiming that “you can’t say you’ve been to Fiji until you’ve had lovo”. Lovo is a traditional way of cooking for many islanders: food is buried underground in a pit with red hot volcanic rocks for a couple of hours creating an underground oven. In New Zealand it’s called Hangi, Pachamanca in South America and Kalua in Hawaii. Lovos are usually only done on festive days, such as family reunions, new year, christmas day, birthdays, etc.

When staying at resorts, some will have lovo nights during the week, but you never get to see how they do it

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